Top 5 CIO Tweets of the Week – August 21, 2009

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I’m posting this weeks Top 5 list from Beijing as I get ready for the CTO Forum Conference.  Sorry if my writing seems a bit jet-lagged and for the low volume (read: none) of Tweets.  China still seems a bit put off by Twitter.

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1-2. The first post set of a series of conversations about the differences between a list of IT thought leaders on Twitter and a list of CIOs on Twitter and a follow-up message from Jason Hiner, TechRepublic’s Editor in Chief.  Participation in Twitter and other social media will favor those CxOs whose businesses depend on it rather than large, Fortune 500 type CIOs.  Still, in my perfect world, CIOs would see the value in participating AND some would be seen as IT thought-leaders.

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3.  A post made in jest, but one that set of two actions.  First, several people angrily asked if he really thought that EA was dead.  I think EA effectiveness is a good topic and I will put that on the list for a future post.  Second, as Gene reports, spambots pummeled him with Tweets pertaining to the “xxx” part of his message.

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4.  I’m a big believer in using several different methods to get your point across.  As many of us are visual thinkers and learners, drawing and diagramming is a great skill to develop.  This is true for a business analyst and the CIO.

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5.  Another interesting topic is social CRM – the mashup of traditional CRM and Social Media.  Michael posed that massive ad hoc communities form on-line in unexpected ways and were difficult to plan for.  After some back and forth, Michael provided the “United Breaks Guitars” video on YouTube as an example of something United could never have predicted or planned for but needs to accept and even embrace.

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  • Isn’t this false advertising? Aren’t these the top 5 enterprise IT tweets? These are some of my favorite twitter users (you too Chris), but most are not CIOs (luckily for them).

  • Isn’t this false advertising? Aren’t these the top 5 enterprise IT tweets? These are some of my favorite twitter users (you too Chris), but most are not CIOs (luckily for them).

  • Having started the “No CIO?” refrain on Jason’s post let me clarify – it was more to point out that vendors, analysts, and yes even bloggers like me sometimes live in our echo-chamber and forget none of matter without the buyer at the table.

    I have worked with a number of CIOs at Gartner and now in my own advisory firm. CIOs, CTOs and other IT execs may not be slick or thought leaders but it pisses me off how in our industry we give entrepreneurs and VCs and Larry and Mark and Gartner all the kudos.

    It starts and end with the customer and it is sign of an unhealthy industry where we grudgingly give them only a bit of token notice.

  • Having started the “No CIO?” refrain on Jason’s post let me clarify – it was more to point out that vendors, analysts, and yes even bloggers like me sometimes live in our echo-chamber and forget none of matter without the buyer at the table.

    I have worked with a number of CIOs at Gartner and now in my own advisory firm. CIOs, CTOs and other IT execs may not be slick or thought leaders but it pisses me off how in our industry we give entrepreneurs and VCs and Larry and Mark and Gartner all the kudos.

    It starts and end with the customer and it is sign of an unhealthy industry where we grudgingly give them only a bit of token notice.

  • Amusing about how the “xxx” got Gene a particular kind of Twitter traffic from spambots. I usually see this sort of thing not in tweets, but in the flood of certain new followers if I inadvertently mention a subject that is perceived to be of “sales value”, so to speak. Tweets tend to come from those folks only if you follow them back.

    My favorite example of this phenomenon was when I used the phrase “down in the weeds” in a tweet, and was promptly followed by Herbie Headshop. This is why it’s critically important that people NOT blindly follow whomever follows them; blind following encourages this sort of overzealous and automated twitstream harvesting, resulting in the salesification of an otherwise useful conversational medium. That’s my strong soapbox, anyway.

  • Amusing about how the “xxx” got Gene a particular kind of Twitter traffic from spambots. I usually see this sort of thing not in tweets, but in the flood of certain new followers if I inadvertently mention a subject that is perceived to be of “sales value”, so to speak. Tweets tend to come from those folks only if you follow them back.

    My favorite example of this phenomenon was when I used the phrase “down in the weeds” in a tweet, and was promptly followed by Herbie Headshop. This is why it’s critically important that people NOT blindly follow whomever follows them; blind following encourages this sort of overzealous and automated twitstream harvesting, resulting in the salesification of an otherwise useful conversational medium. That’s my strong soapbox, anyway.

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  • Chris Curran

    Appreciate the comments Peter, Vinnie and Will.

    And, yes, the title is a bit misleading. Maybe better titled “Top 5 #CIO – related Tweets” 🙂

    -cc

  • Can Twitter Be Saved?

  • Can Twitter Be Saved?